What Is Discriminatory Harassment?

Discriminatory harassment can take many forms. It may be, but is not limited to: words, signs, jokes, pranks, intimidation, physical contact, or violence. It also may include harassment that is sexual in nature or directed at the gender of another (as in sexual harassment). See Title IX Policy.

Speech or other expression constitutes harassment by personal vilification if it:

a) is intended to insult or stigmatize an individual or an identifiable group of College-related individuals on the basis of their race, color, national origin, ancestry, sex, gender, gender identity, gender expression, sexual orientation, physical and/or mental disability, age, religion, medical condition, veteran status, marital status or any other characteristic protected by institutional policy or state, local, or federal law and

b) is addressed directly to or at (though not necessarily in the presence of) the individual or individuals whom it insults or stigmatizes, and

c) makes use of words or nonverbal symbols that convey hatred or contempt for human beings on the basis of their race, color, national origin, ancestry, sex, gender, gender identity, gender expression, sexual orientation, physical and/or mental disability, age, religion, medical condition, veteran status, marital status or any other characteristic protected by institutional policy or state, local, or federal law.

Harassment may also be constituted by nonverbal acts that would also be punishable as, for example, vandalism, physical assault, or destruction of property. Other examples of harassment include epithets or "jokes" referring to an individual's group-based attributes; placement of offensive written or visual material on another's work area; offensive messages sent through email; and undesired physical contact, physical violence, or threat of same. See Title IX Policy.

Read Kenyon's Discrimination Policy.