Color is one of life's great joys. Visual artists and designers learn to orchestrate color and use it in a particularly sensitive and purposeful manner, just as composers learn to orchestrate sound to create music. This course is about the orchestration of color by design. Students begin by doing a series of formal exercises designed to expand their understanding of color interaction and design principles. They then use what they have learned to complete a series of mixed media collages of their own design. Conceptual and formal growth is stressed, as is creativity. Students work with pigmented paper and "found objects." This counts toward the introductory requirement for the major and minor. No prerequisite. Offered once every third year.

This course introduces students to the medium of drawing as an essential means of visual communication. A variety of methods and materials are used for both in-class studies as well as for larger and more comprehensive projects. Challenging and complex drawings will be produced with a sharp focus on both formal and conceptual issues. Technical aspects of drawing will be balanced with imaginative and experimental approaches throughout the semester. Presentations and class discussions will supplement assignments to aid in expansion of the understanding of project goals. This counts toward the introductory requirement for the major and minor. No prerequisite. Offered every semester.

This course presents an introduction to three-dimensional art through exploration of its basic elements (line, plane, mass and color) and its basic ordering principles (unity, balance, rhythm and dominance). Individual projects will be of two types: one-day projects allowing quick, spontaneous explorations; and longer, more elaborate projects allowing careful execution of individual ideas. This course assumes little or no previous sculptural experience. However, for those who wish to move on to more elaborate materials and techniques, instruction and encouragement will be given. The course format will include slide lectures, group critiques and individual instruction. Material purchases are the responsibility of each student. This counts toward the introductory requirement for the major and minor. No prerequisite. Offered each semester.

This course is an introduction to the principles, strategies and processes of photographic practice. It is designed to broaden the student's aesthetic explorations and to help the student develop a visual language in the media. This course includes instruction in digital camera operation such as image editing, creative camera work, color digital printing, and both natural and studio lighting concepts and composition. Through readings and discussions, students will be introduced to different ways of conceptualizing photography, and students will examine a range of historical and contemporary photo work as an essential part of understanding the possibilities of image making. Photography I is a project-structured course, with lectures, demonstrations, project assignments, regular critiques with active participation, discussions and one exam. Having a personal digital camera is recommended, although some cameras are available for student check out to complete the course.

This introductory course will enable students to explore digital media while engaging in aesthetic and conceptual practices in contemporary art. They will come to understand the fundamentals of visual form and to develop technical skills with a variety of camera and computer tools, including still-image and video editing programs. Personal studio projects will cover a variety of subjects, such as the relationship between the arts, popular culture and the liberal arts, the historic role of technology in the arts, and the role of one's cultural and historical context in the creation and interpretation of artwork. Through theory and practice, students will enhance their art-criticism skills, allowing for productive group interactions and the defining of personal aesthetic vision. Presentations and demonstrations by the professor will be supplemented by student research and response to contemporary artists and issues. At least ten hours of work per week outside of class is required. This counts toward the introductory requirement for the major and minor. No prerequisite. Offered every semester.

In this course students will use various drawing techniques to explore design and innovation. Students will examine how the way we live in the present world is dependent on how our world has been drawn in the past. Drawing and its potential as a tool for understanding, invention and change is as vital to new ways of thinking about art as it is to communication, transportation, work and dwelling space. Students will do exercises in realistic depiction, graphic design, industrial design and architectural conceptualizing and rendering, while exploring methods and processes for enhancing and engaging your imagination. We will approach creativity and imagination as innate faculties that are fostered and strengthened through visual and intellectual training. This course is composed of four segments: observational drawing, design innovation of objects, architectural and interior design, and organizational and conceptual design. This counts toward the introductory requirement for the major and minor. No prerequisite. Offered once a year.

This course is an intermediate-level study of digital photography as a creative medium. Students should have a solid foundation in image editing and asset management software, as well as knowledgeable digital camera skills including aperture and shutter speed selection for exposure control and visual impact. Assignments will focus on the development of a unique and individual relationship with making pictures, to question preconceived ideas and photographic boundaries, foster conceptual growth, and intensively discuss and integrate critical thought with practice. Students may work in a variety of approaches and styles, such as documentary, environmental portraiture, visual storytelling, abstraction, and others. Having a personal digital camera is recommended, although some cameras are available for student check out to complete the course. Prerequisite: ARTS 106, ARTS 107, or permission of instructor.

An introduction to black and white silver-based photography, including the principles of film exposure and processing, and printing enlargements using chemical methods and materials in the darkroom. The course begins with an emphasis on understanding and mastering technical procedures and evolves into an investigation of the creative and conceptual possibilities of making images. Refinement of wet darkroom processes include use of contrast filters, dodging and burning, negative storage, and retouching and mounting prints. Assignments, ideas and important examples of historic and contemporary photography will be presented via a series of slide lectures, critiques and discussion. Students will be responsible for purchasing supplies for the course. Having a personal film camera is recommended, although some cameras are available for student check out to complete the course. This counts toward one of four intermediate level courses for the major. Prerequisite: ARTS 106, ARTS 107 or permission of instructor.

This course will introduce the student to historical techniques in photography and consider how these approaches can augment contemporary vision. The student will explore the concept of light and time as they work with the properties of camera-less photography, pinhole photography, hand-coated emulsions such as palladium printing, as well as film and digital negative output. Projects will emphasize innovation, experimentation, and continuing growth in both technical and aesthetic accomplishment. Having a personal digital or film camera is recommended, although some cameras are available for student check out to complete the course. Prerequisite: ARTS 222 or permission of instructor.

This course engages students in a rigorous and thorough exploration of a two-dimensional representation of the human figure in drawing. Aesthetic and anatomical study of the human figure extends throughout the semester. Assignments include the investigation of the use of figures in formal compositions, political and social narrative constructs and psychologically complex environments. The semester culminates with a seven-foot-tall full-figure self-portrait in graphite. Students utilize a variety of drawing methods and materials, including graphite, charcoal, ink, spray-paint and collage. Students give presentations on contemporary figurative artists during the semester. "The Naked Nude" is the accompanying text for this class. This counts toward the intermediate requirement for the major and minor. Prerequisite: ARTS 102. Offered once a year.

After a century of development, cartoons, comic books, graphic novels, and self-published zines are finding their potency and maturity as serious art forms. These cartoon-based mediums form collaboration between image and text, which blends the shape and arc of classic literature with the conventions of visual storytelling. This course will provide students with a solid foundation of ideas and methods for drawing and writing cartoons, comics, zines, and graphic novels with an emphasis on effective characterization, plot progression and narrative structure. Students will learn how to adapt writing to a comic through storyboarding create a detailed script for dialogue, setting and action and explore the interactive development of text and image. Required and recommended readings will supplement the creative assignments. Class meetings will consist of technical drawing demonstrations, writing and drawing exercises, and discussions for weekly assignments and longer projects. This counts towards the intermediate requirement for the major and minor. Prerequisite: ARTS 102. Offered every other year.

This course is an introduction to the fundamental principles of painting. The course will begin with an investigation into painting materials and how they influence ideas. Students will explore color, composition and surface development on board, panel and canvas, while focusing on a wide range of basic approaches to oil painting. We will utilize traditional and nontraditional contemporary methods to address the historically established genres of still life, landscape and portraiture. Visual literacy and conceptual growth are essential. Teacher presentations, group critiques, student reports and readings along with individual instruction will help the student to develop original concepts. This counts toward the intermediate requirement for the major and minor. Prerequisite: ARTS 102 or 106. Offered once a year.

This course is intended to introduce monoprint and monotype techniques. These processes as they relate to painting and drawing are immediate, tactile and low-tech. A primary advantage is that it allows you to work a single idea in multiples. It is unique in that there can never be an exact edition of a single image. We begin with painting oil paint or ink onto Plexiglas and progress to viscosity color printing. Students learn to layer the surface and build up the image from many printings. They also have the opportunity to produce monoprints in drypoint, collograph techniques and continue printing with other methods such as collage, photo image transfer and embossing. This counts toward one of the four intermediate level courses required for the major. Prerequisite: ARTS 102.

Developing moving sequences from still images is both a historical and contemporary practice. Experimental artists and filmmakers use the process to create actions that could not be presented through real-time film. This class will emphasize manipulating materials from paper to found objects, creating innovative contexts for movement, integrating live video and sound recording and experimenting with the structure of time. The course will include both two- and three-dimensional approaches to stop-motion, with emphasis on innovation and cultural critique. Class structure will include presentations of historical and contemporary work, class demonstrations of equipment and software, studio time and critiques. This counts toward the intermediate requirement for the major and minor. Prerequisite: ARTS 101, 102, 103, 104, 106, 107, 108 or permission of instructor. Offered every other year.

The focus of this class is the digital making of still color photographs with particular emphasis on the potential meaning of images with color content, symbolism, and complexities such as the relationship of the photograph to culture, observational interpretations, narrative fictions, and the conjuring of the hyperreal. Students work in the digital lab on furthering their skills in capture, image editing, color workflow management, creative camera work, and color digital printing. Through readings and discussions, critiques and project-based portfolio development, students will utilize the medium as a means of refining and clarifying one's artistic language. Having a personal digital camera is recommended, although some cameras are available for student check out to complete the course. Prerequisite: ARTS106, ARTS107 or permission of instructor.

This course expands the student's knowledge of black and white film photography, as they are guided towards the evolution of a personalized body of work that is culturally, theoretically and historically informed. Students will work with 35mm cameras, and have opportunities to learn other format film capture, as they further their abilities and experiences with control of the negative and the fine silver print. This course includes demonstrations, lab work, readings, field assignments, and individual and group critiques. Students will be responsible for purchasing supplies for the course. Having a personal film camera is recommended, although some cameras are available for student check out to complete the course. This course will count towards one of four intermediate level courses for the major. Prerequisite: ARTS 222 or permission of instructor.

This course is structured to create an open environment for students to develop a series of self-determined photographic projects, either by analog or digital means. With faculty mentorship, students will formulate, propose, research, and pursue personal photographic work with the goal of testing and iterating new concepts, and inventing new possibilities in their artistic practice. Student work is discussed in regular critiques, and accompanied by written artist statements for each project. Students will be exposed to contemporary photographic theory, issues, and practices, in order to explore how contemporary photographers have worked to challenge, expand, and reinvent the medium. Readings, image lectures, discussions, and critiques will assist the student in articulating their own ideas and building a context for their own practice in relation to these contemporary dialogues. Having a personal film and/or digital camera is recommended, although some cameras are available for student check out to complete the course. Prior knowledge of camera functions and post-production techniques is expected. Students with digital experience from one of the digital course prerequisites may work in the digital lab, students with analog experience from one of the analog course prerequisites may work in the chemical lab, and students with both prior experiences may work in both labs. This counts toward one of four intermediate level courses for the major. Prerequisite: two of ARTS 106, 107, 220, 221, 222, 322, 325 and permission of instructor.

This class provides an overview of some of the most direct and fundamental forms of mechanical reproduction. A balance between technical mastery and imaginative visual exploration is the goal throughout this course. The processes employed during the semester combine aspects of drawing and painting, as well as a sculptural physicality, giving students the opportunity to explore and experiment with various combinations of visual processes. Students will be challenged to synthesize and internalize diverse aesthetic approaches, while working to formulate a personal vision. All students will give presentations on modern and contemporary artists. Techniques include monotype, woodcut, linoleum print, dry point and intaglio. This counts toward the intermediate requirement for the major and minor. Prerequisite: ARTS 102, 103, 106 or 107. Offered once a year.

This class is an intensive studio course that explores painting as a means of investigating and developing personally meaningful imagery. As an introduction, we will examine the parallel ideas of art for art's sake and art for the people, as well as the evolution of American painting from the early 20th century to the present. Throughout the semester, we will continue to study the work of contemporary painters. Students will be expected to master a wide range of visual vocabularies and approach painting from a variety of aesthetic points of view. Through structured problem-solving assignments, students will be encouraged to find ways of addressing common experiences as well as developing independent work. These assignments are designed to assist in expanding perceptions and imagination and translating them into painted images. Group and one-on-one critiques will help develop critical thinking and the ability to articulate ideas about art. This counts toward the intermediate requirement for the major and minor. Prerequisite: ARTS 102, 106, 250 or 345. Offered once a year.

This course allows students to explore art that is based on a merger of space and time and on a relationship between the artist and the visitor. Perhaps the most inclusive and pervasive art form in the last forty years, installation art has roots in cinema, performance art, set design, architecture, graphic design, land art, public art, curating, art criticism and history in addition to the more traditional visual arts. In this class, students will create immersive environments that are either site-specific or nomadic. They also will have the opportunity to integrate performance, video and audio components in their projects. Components range from everyday objects to surveillance video, from large wall drawings to interactive switches for participants to manipulate. The class will consist of demonstrations of art skills particularly useful in installation (sculptural, video, audio, graphic presentation and so on), presentations, readings, weekly critiques and cumulative projects. Previous experience with any creative media such as writing, dance, music or performance will be helpful. This counts toward the intermediate requirement for the major and minor. Prerequisite: ARTS 102, 103, 106, 107 or permission of instructor. Offered once a year.

In this course students will experiment with the creation, manipulation and exhibition of digital film and sound projects. In doing so they will continue a tradition from early filmmaking, where abstract montage, surreal fantasy and playful narratives reflected innovations in the art, science and politics of the time. Like many current artists and filmmakers, students will follow the example of these historical trajectories by using contemporary technologies and concepts for acquisition, post-production and distribution of their work. Demonstrations of a wide range of equipment and software will be provided from low-tech to high-tech. Research of historical/cultural forms, will offer a context for the assignments. Frequent critiques will offer important feedback. This counts toward the intermediate requirement for the major and minor. Prerequisite: ARTS 106, 107 or permission of instructor. Offered every other year.

This course is an introduction to the elements of website design and using the language of the web as a platform for virtual interactivity and art. Students will learn and utilize HTML, CSS, and jQuery, in conjunction with Dreamweaver and Photoshop. Design concepts, functionality and best practices will be taught while looking at the history of net art and using the web as a creative medium. Image capture and creation of new artwork for projects will be primarily photo and video-based. Class will be a mix of projects, lecture, demonstrations and critique. This counts toward the intermediate requirement for the major and minor. Prerequisite: ARTS 107 or 321. Offered once a year.

This studio art class is structured to familiarize art students with the complex terrain of the contemporary art world. Students will first research and then use as a point of departure various aspects and trends that have been prevalent in the art world over the past 20 years. Projects will include researching concept proposals, artist statements and other written materials, oral presentation, model building and a finished body of work. Students will be responsible for choosing the media and methods for the fabrication of these projects. Students will do readings and research as well as oral/written presentations on various aspects of the aesthetic dialogue that has contributed to the shaping of contemporary art. All bodies of work will grow out of the course research and will be generated in consultation with the professor and the class as a whole. Creativity and development strategies will help guide students in their conceptual process. Prerequisite: junior standing studio art major or permission of instructor.

Required for majors in studio arts, this first semester of a two-semester sequence of courses is designed to enable students to develop their personal artistic vision based on the foundation of introductory and intermediate studio art courses. Students will be expected to develop a self-generated body of creative work based on a concentrated investigation of materials, methods and ideas. They will develop oral and written presentation and research skills as they work toward a professional exhibition in the second semester. Critiques, discussions, presentations and readings will provide context and feedback for this process. Students will learn to develop the elements necessary for professional exhibition of a cohesive body of work, including developing ideas, writing an artist's statement and resume, and perfecting presentation skills. Studio art majors are expected to take this class and ARTS 481 with two different faculty members. Prerequisite: senior art major or permission of instructor. Offered every fall.

Required for majors in studio arts, this course is designed to enable students to further develop their personal artistic vision based on the foundation of their earlier studio courses and ARTS 480. Well into their senior projects at the start of the semester, students will continue to refine their concepts and skills into a cohesive body of work for exhibition at the end of the semester. Critiques, discussions and presentations will continue to amplify the studio experience. Professional presentation, writing artistic statements and resumes and visual documentation skills will be part of the course. The senior capstone, an exhibition required of studio art majors, will include artwork made during this course. Prerequisite: ARTS 480 and senior art major or permission of instructor. Offered every spring.

The studio art faculty does not recommend individual study because we feel it is important for students to work in the context of other student artists. We understand, however, that on rare occasions an individual study may be appropriate. Individual study must be approved by the department according to the following guidelines: Individual study should be undertaken only when a student has exhausted all the options for that medium in the regular curriculum. The subject for an individual study must be in a discipline in which the faculty member has expertise. When possible, the individual study student should participate in some aspects of a course working in a similar medium in the faculty member's field in order to gain feedback from other students. The student is responsible for writing a contract and maintaining a schedule. Because students must enroll for individual studies by the end of the seventh class day of each semester, they should begin discussion of the proposed individual study preferably the semester before, so that there is time to devise the proposal and seek departmental approval before the registrar’s deadline. An individual study does not count toward the requirements for the major; it is considered an extra course.