Jonathan Tazewell has been teaching at Kenyon since 1997. He won the Trustees' Excellence in Teaching Award from the college in 2004 and was named The Thomas S. Turgeon Professor of Drama and Film in 2008. That endowed position was named for his mentor and friend, a beloved teacher in the Kenyon Department of Dance Drama and Film. Tazewell won the Distinguished Service Award from the college in 2018. He is a 1984 graduate of the College, having majored in chemistry. Two years after his graduation, he returned to work for the Kenyon Admissions Office. Tazewell earned his master of fine arts degree from California Institute of the Arts in directing for theater, video and cinema in 1994. When he returned to join the Kenyon faculty, he developed and established the Kenyon film major. His recent work includes his feature film, "Gotta Get Down To It," which has won awards at several film festivals in 2020. Tazewell continues to pursue his work as an actor, director and writer. His productions include a one-man production of "Paul Robeson" at the Red Herring Theater (Columbus, OH), work with the Arden Theater Company (Philadelphia), Walnut Street Theater (Philadelphia) and Contemporary American Theatre Company (Columbus). He also has several independent films to his credit, including his award winning short film, "Breezewood." In addition to his teaching in both drama and film, he directs productions for the annual play season in the Department of Dance Drama and Film.

Areas of Expertise

Theater directing, filmmaking, acting

Education

1995 — Master of Fine Arts from California Institute Arts

1984 — Bachelor of Arts from Kenyon College

Courses Recently Taught

The work of this course involves the realization in the theater of the efforts of an important playwright, as expressed in the text for a particular play. Problems in textual analysis, historical research and the creation of a production lead, by way of independent and cooperative activity involving acting, design and special problems, to public performance before an audience. Note: Students who, in the judgment of the instructional and directorial staff, have made significant creative contributions to the effectiveness of the production will have "audit" indicated on their academic record. No credit is awarded for an audited course.

Through the rehearsal and performance of various scenes, students will explore the nature of the actor's contribution to the theater. Work will include performance exercises, readings and written assignments. This counts toward the elements requirement for the major. Prerequisite: DRAM 111. Offered every year.

Individual study in drama is reserved for students exploring a topic not regularly offered in the department's curriculum. Typically, the course will carry .5 unit of credit. To enroll in an individual study, a student must identify a member of the department willing to direct the project and, in consultation with him or her, write a proposal. The department chair must approve the proposal. The one- to two-page proposal should include a preliminary bibliography and/or set of specific problems, goals and tasks for the course; outline a schedule of reading and/or writing assignments or creative undertakings and describe the methods of assessment (e.g., a journal to be submitted for evaluation weekly, a one-act play due at semester's end, with drafts due at given intervals, and so on). The student also should briefly describe prior coursework which qualifies him or her for this independent project. At a minimum, the department expects the student to meet regularly with the instructor one hour per week and to submit an amount of work equivalent to that required in 300-level dance and drama courses. Students are urged to begin discussion of their proposed individual study the semester before they hope to enroll, so that they can devise a proposal and seek departmental approval before the deadline.

In this course we will consider the collaborative nature of filmmaking and how its various crafts combine to tell stories with perhaps the greatest mass appeal of any artistic medium. We will explore dramatic narrative structure, mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing and film genres as they have been used and advanced in the history of cinema. In addition to regular class meetings, attendance at weekly film showings is required. This course includes an introduction to film production where students are expected to write, direct and film short projects in collaboration with their classmates. This course is ideal for first-year students and is required for the major. No prerequisite. Generally offered once a year.

Because the director has, perhaps, the most comprehensive impact on a film, this course considers films directed by African-American people. The representation of African Americans throughout history has been perverted using visual imagery, and modern images in film and television are not exempt. However, African Americans have been contributing since the beginning of film history to the imaging or re-imaging of the culture and its people. This course will look at these contributions and the images of African Americans they help to create, as well as how these representations have changed over time. This counts toward the film genre course requirement for the major. No prerequisite. Generally offered every third year.

This course will focus on the understanding of cinema through the practical application of pre-production and post-production techniques. Students will learn the art of telling a story on screen by taking on the roles of the major positions in a film production, including producer, director, actor, cinematographer and editor. This course will be taught at the Wright Center in Mt. Vernon. This counts toward the production course requirement for the major. Prerequisite: DRAM 111 or FILM 111. Generally offered every year.

This is a course in screen acting. Students will explore the unique and peculiar nature of acting in front of a camera. What demands does screen acting have that are different from performances on stage? How do screen actors tell a coherent story given the disruptive process of filming a narrative? Students will explore the nature and technique of acting on camera by performing scenes from existing screenplays with classmates, and the scenes will be recorded. We will watch these recordings in class and critique students' work. Students will be graded on their preparation and performance. Students will engage with several visiting artists who work in the film and television industry. This counts toward the production course requirement for the major. Prerequisite: DRAM 111. Generally offered every third year.

This course is designed primarily for students majoring in film, though it is not limited to senior majors. It is also open to non-majors with a significant interest in film directing who have taken many film courses offered in the department. Students will make a series of very short films and develop a film project of approximately 10–15 minutes in length. This process will involve a deeper understanding of writing, budgeting, producing, cinematography and editing of short films through class exercises. This course will be taught at the Wright Center in Mt. Vernon. This counts toward the production course requirement for the major. Prerequisite: FILM 261 or permission of instructor. Generally offered every year.

This seminar is for senior majors in film. Through this course, senior majors will prepare for the completion of their Senior Capstone. Students will present their project proposals, develop these projects through collaboration with peers, critique each other's work and utilize feedback to improve their individual projects. Students will be expected to provide project schedules and weekly status updates and to meet regular guideposts for project completion. This course will culminate in public presentations of the senior projects and oral examinations by faculty in the department. One semester of this course is required for the major but it may be taken twice for credit.

Individual study in film is reserved for students exploring a topic not regularly offered in the department's curriculum. Typically, the course will carry 0.5 units of credit. To enroll in an individual study, a student must identify a member of the department willing to direct the project and, in consultation with him or her, write a proposal. The department chair must approve the proposal. The one- to two-page proposal should include a preliminary bibliography and/or set of specific problems, goals and tasks for the course, outline a schedule of reading and/or writing assignments or creative undertakings, and describe the methods of assessment (e.g., a journal to be submitted for evaluation weekly, a feature length screenplay due at semester's end, with drafts due at given intervals, etc). The student also should briefly describe prior course work, which qualifies him or her for this independent project. At a minimum, the department expects the student to meet regularly with the instructor one hour per week and to submit an amount of work equivalent to that required in 300-level film courses. Students are urged to begin discussion of their proposed individual study the semester before they hope to enroll so that they can devise a proposal and seek departmental approval before the deadline.

Individual study in film is reserved for students exploring a topic not regularly offered in the department's curriculum. Typically, the course will carry 0.5 units of credit. To enroll in an individual study, a student must identify a member of the department willing to direct the project and, in consultation with him or her, write a proposal. The department chair must approve the proposal. The one- to two-page proposal should include a preliminary bibliography and/or set of specific problems, goals and tasks for the course, outline a schedule of reading and/or writing assignments or creative undertakings, and describe the methods of assessment (e.g., a journal to be submitted for evaluation weekly, a feature length screenplay due at semester's end, with drafts due at given intervals, etc). The student also should briefly describe prior course work, which qualifies him or her for this independent project. At a minimum, the department expects the student to meet regularly with the instructor one hour per week and to submit an amount of work equivalent to that required in 300-level film courses. Students are urged to begin discussion of their proposed individual study the semester before they hope to enroll so that they can devise a proposal and seek departmental approval before the deadline.

Individual study in film is reserved for students exploring a topic not regularly offered in the department's curriculum. Typically, the course will carry 0.5 units of credit. To enroll in an individual study, a student must identify a member of the department willing to direct the project and, in consultation with him or her, write a proposal. The department chair must approve the proposal. The one- to two-page proposal should include a preliminary bibliography and/or set of specific problems, goals and tasks for the course, outline a schedule of reading and/or writing assignments or creative undertakings, and describe the methods of assessment (e.g., a journal to be submitted for evaluation weekly, a feature length screenplay due at semester's end, with drafts due at given intervals, etc). The student also should briefly describe prior course work, which qualifies him or her for this independent project. At a minimum, the department expects the student to meet regularly with the instructor one hour per week and to submit an amount of work equivalent to that required in 300-level film courses. Students are urged to begin discussion of their proposed individual study the semester before they hope to enroll so that they can devise a proposal and seek departmental approval before the deadline.

Individual study in film is reserved for students exploring a topic not regularly offered in the department's curriculum. Typically, the course will carry 0.5 units of credit. To enroll in an individual study, a student must identify a member of the department willing to direct the project and, in consultation with him or her, write a proposal. The department chair must approve the proposal. The one- to two-page proposal should include a preliminary bibliography and/or set of specific problems, goals and tasks for the course, outline a schedule of reading and/or writing assignments or creative undertakings, and describe the methods of assessment (e.g., a journal to be submitted for evaluation weekly, a feature length screenplay due at semester's end, with drafts due at given intervals, etc). The student also should briefly describe prior course work, which qualifies him or her for this independent project. At a minimum, the department expects the student to meet regularly with the instructor one hour per week and to submit an amount of work equivalent to that required in 300-level film courses. Students are urged to begin discussion of their proposed individual study the semester before they hope to enroll so that they can devise a proposal and seek departmental approval before the deadline.

Individual study in film is reserved for students exploring a topic not regularly offered in the department's curriculum. Typically, the course will carry 0.5 units of credit. To enroll in an individual study, a student must identify a member of the department willing to direct the project and, in consultation with him or her, write a proposal. The department chair must approve the proposal. The one- to two-page proposal should include a preliminary bibliography and/or set of specific problems, goals and tasks for the course, outline a schedule of reading and/or writing assignments or creative undertakings, and describe the methods of assessment (e.g., a journal to be submitted for evaluation weekly, a feature length screenplay due at semester's end, with drafts due at given intervals, etc). The student also should briefly describe prior course work, which qualifies him or her for this independent project. At a minimum, the department expects the student to meet regularly with the instructor one hour per week and to submit an amount of work equivalent to that required in 300-level film courses. Students are urged to begin discussion of their proposed individual study the semester before they hope to enroll so that they can devise a proposal and seek departmental approval before the deadline.

Individual study in film is reserved for students exploring a topic not regularly offered in the department's curriculum. Typically, the course will carry 0.5 units of credit. To enroll in an individual study, a student must identify a member of the department willing to direct the project and, in consultation with him or her, write a proposal. The department chair must approve the proposal. The one- to two-page proposal should include a preliminary bibliography and/or set of specific problems, goals and tasks for the course, outline a schedule of reading and/or writing assignments or creative undertakings, and describe the methods of assessment (e.g., a journal to be submitted for evaluation weekly, a feature length screenplay due at semester's end, with drafts due at given intervals, etc). The student also should briefly describe prior course work, which qualifies him or her for this independent project. At a minimum, the department expects the student to meet regularly with the instructor one hour per week and to submit an amount of work equivalent to that required in 300-level film courses. Students are urged to begin discussion of their proposed individual study the semester before they hope to enroll so that they can devise a proposal and seek departmental approval before the deadline.

Individual study in film is reserved for students exploring a topic not regularly offered in the department's curriculum. Typically, the course will carry 0.5 units of credit. To enroll in an individual study, a student must identify a member of the department willing to direct the project and, in consultation with him or her, write a proposal. The department chair must approve the proposal. The one- to two-page proposal should include a preliminary bibliography and/or set of specific problems, goals and tasks for the course, outline a schedule of reading and/or writing assignments or creative undertakings, and describe the methods of assessment (e.g., a journal to be submitted for evaluation weekly, a feature length screenplay due at semester's end, with drafts due at given intervals, etc). The student also should briefly describe prior course work, which qualifies him or her for this independent project. At a minimum, the department expects the student to meet regularly with the instructor one hour per week and to submit an amount of work equivalent to that required in 300-level film courses. Students are urged to begin discussion of their proposed individual study the semester before they hope to enroll so that they can devise a proposal and seek departmental approval before the deadline.