Once a student has been approved for a testing accommodation the student will discuss the appropriate arrangement for tests in each course with their faculty.

SASS has two distraction limited spaces and eight spaces that are not distraction limited spaces. The testing operates from 8:30 a.m. until 12 p.m. and from 1 to 4:30 p.m. These spaces can be reserved by the student if faculty are unable to provide an appropriate space. Please contact the SASS office if you are unable to schedule a test within these testing hours.

Students will need to take the test at the same time as the class or overlap with the test time whenever possible. Students may need to test on a different day due to their course schedule or due to the limited SASS spaces. The SASS spaces will be assigned on a first come first serve basis. SASS also has a fleet of reservable laptops that can used for testing. Email Emily Wise at wisee@kenyon.edu or call 740-427-5692 three days in advance to request a laptop.

Schedule a monitored test space with SASS

Monitored tests will take place in the SASS Office in the Chalmers library.

  1. The student requests a space in the Accommodate system three full days prior to the test.
  2. SASS will approve the request if space is available.
  3. SASS will confirm the testing time with faculty
  4. Faculty will upload a copy of the test in the Accommodate system 24 hours prior to the test

Faculty and students can make testing arrangements on their own

Unmonitored tests take place in the Chalmers Library. Students can reserve a space in the Chalmers Library by filling out the "Student-Chalmers Library Study Space Reservations Request" in the Event Management System

Students can get permission from faculty to test in a space the student or the faculty member can reserve in the Event Management System. These tests will not be proctored or monitored by SASS. 

SASS can assist faculty if their digital test will not accommodate the student’s accommodation for alternative formats, large formats and other needs.

Please note that final exams must be taken at the regularly scheduled time and cannot be given at alternate times without special permission from the dean of academic advising.

Distraction limited testing 

A distraction limited environment means that the student needs to take the exam in an area that is reasonably quiet with low stimuli, when compared to the classroom. The environment doesn't need to be a silent private setting. The environment can include taking the test with other students and the room chosen must allow for students to start and finish their exams with limited interruptions. Tools that may help further reduce distractions for students may include: noise canceling headsets, ear plugs, study carrels, etc. 

Examples: 

• Reasonable locations include: a reserved conference room, office, or lounge with a door

• Unreasonable locations: a hallway, or a room that people frequent and can't be reserved.

• Distractions that need to be avoided include, but are not limited to: ringing telephones, conversations, rustling of chairs/papers, coughing, excessive movement, typing, traffic, etc.

Alone testing

A private room accommodation means that the student needs to take an exam in a reasonably quiet with low stimuli room on their own. A TA or professor can be in the room to proctor a test/quiz. However, the proctor must be mindful of creating distractions. 

Examples: 

• Reasonable locations include: a reserved conference room, office, or lounge with a door {with no other students/unnecessary persons around)

• Unreasonable locations: a hallway, or a room that people frequent and can't be reserved.

• Distractions that need to be avoided include, but are not limited to: ringing telephones, conversations, rustling of chairs/papers, coughing, excessive movement, typing, traffic, etc.

Required Testing Information

Accommodations at the post-secondary level are based on complete neuropsychological or psycho educational assessments. These assessments are used to determine the current impact of the disability on the student’s in specific academic settings. Documentation typically includes both aptitude and academic achievement testing, information processing and/or other test data relevant to the specific diagnosis. IEPs or 504 plans provide helpful additional information in addition to a full educational evaluation.

Educational tests include, but are not limited to the following:

Aptitude Tests

  • WAIS-III, WJ-R,
  • Kaufman Adult Intelligence scale or
  • Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale  

Academic Achievement Tests

  • Scholastic Abilities Tests for Adults
  • Woodcock Johnson Psychoeducational Battery- Revised (WJ-R Tests of Achievement)
  • Stanford Test of Academic Skills

Specific Achievement Tests

  • Nelson-Denny Reading Skills Test
  • Stanford Diagnostic Mathematics Test
  • Test of Written Langauag-3 (TOWL-3)
  • Woodcock Reading Mastery Tests – Revised

Information Processing Tests

  • Detroit Tests of Learning Aptitude- 3 (DTLA-3)
  •  Adult DTLA-A
  •  Information from the WAIS-III or WJ-R

ADHD-specific

  •  Connor Continuous Performance Rating Scale
  •  Stroop’s Color/Word Test
  •  Brown Adolescent Attention Deficit Scale
  •  Trail Making Test

Documentation should include test scores and an evaluation summary. It should be current, within the past 3-5 years. Please contact us with any specific questions that you may have regarding educational testing and the college requirements.