Students will study various gender issues in sport that mirror societal disparities. We will investigate the history of sport as society has evolved and the history of gender relations in sport and how gender is used to enforce inequities in sport culture. No prerequisite. Offered every spring.

The aim of this course is to enable students to make well-informed decisions about a healthy lifestyle. Students will learn the fundamental principles of sports medicine, a discipline derived from exercise physiology and orthopedic medicine. Although traditionally concerned with athletic injuries, this field has expanded to include an array of health-related areas, including nutrition, the use of performance-enhancing supplements, strength training and cardiovascular fitness, basic psychology, pharmacology and substance abuse. By learning about these topics, students will be better prepared to make sensible lifestyle choices that can improve the quality of health and wellness in their lives. No prerequisite. Offered each semester.

This course will instruct individuals interested in sport, wellness and personal nutrition how to use both macronutrients and micronutrients as fuel for performance. All information will follow national guidelines on nutrition. Students will come to understand the foundations of human nutrition and be prepared to make sound nutritional decisions. They will be prepared to integrate nutritional information with personal fitness and sport programs and will understand the concepts of performance periodization and nutrition periodization. They will gain knowledge and experience through the use of discussion forums and in-class activity sessions that will teach them how to choose meals wisely in the dining halls and how to create healthy meals and snacks that will meet energy needs. A background in chemistry or biology is helpful. No prerequisite. Offered every fall semester.

This course is designed to meet the training and skills needs for anyone who works, travels or spends time in rural or wilderness areas. By understanding how to prepare for trips, follow wilderness ethics guidelines, and use or construct outdoor equipment, the student will be better prepared to meet the demands of the outdoor environment. The student will learn wilderness-specific first aid techniques, including completing a physical exam, treating wounds and head/neck/spinal injuries, dealing with heat- and cold-related illnesses, caring for major injuries, and evacuating the backcountry. The student will learn how to signal for help when phones are not available and create crude shelters for protection from the elements. There will be an optional capstone overnight backpacking trip to cement the newly learned skills in an outdoor environment. Upon successful completion of classroom and skill components, the student will be eligible to receive the American Red Cross Wilderness First Aid certification. There is a charge for Red Cross instructional materials and certification fee. No prerequisite. Offered every spring.

This is a laboratory based course that allows the student to explore topics relating to exercise and exercise training. Topics will range from one-week investigations of short-term responses to exercise to multi-week investigations of exercise training effects on a variety of cardiovascular and musculoskeletal variables. Students will develop methodology for investigating the effect of exercise on selected aspects of human anatomy and physiology. The student will use monitored, in-class exercise participation and exercise testing as a means to assimilate objective data regarding physical response to exercise and build conclusions based on the results of self-testing. No prerequisite. Offered every spring.

This course is a mixed-format (lecture, discussion, activity, online modules) course intended for students with a demonstrated interest in fire and emergency medical services who are either planning to complete an EMT-Basic course through another organization or have already done so. The course reviews and builds upon concepts covered in EMT-Basic, extending the knowledge base and skills while allowing the student to develop an awareness of personal wellness and community wellness. HSPS 200 reinforces and builds upon the EMT-Basic and continuing education requirements in a holistic way that emphasizes personal and community wellness via personal reflection, self-critique and community involvement. Offered each spring semester, HSPS 200 does not satisfy the requirements for any major. Permission of instructor required. Prerequisites: current member of College Township Fire Department and successful completion of or current enrollment in HSPS 184, PHSD 113 or PHSD 182, Current CPR and First Aid certification, Wilderness/Remote First Aid, Wilderness First Responder or EMR from an approved organization Current EMT Basic or higher.

A study of the structure and function of the human body covering all systems, this course will also explore structure and function at the cellular level, interrelationships among systems, and vocabulary and basic medical terminology. The course utilizes a blended learning format of in-class lecture and online tutorials and readings. Intended both for students interested in learning more about the human body and those interested in a sport sciences career, as the course will touch on exercise physiology, kinesiology, athletic training/sports medicine, nursing and physical therapy. Upon its conclusion, the student will have a working vocabulary of anatomy terminology; know the histology of structures in the human body; comprehend the structure and function of human cells; be able to describe human anatomy and physiology systems; and be able to describe anatomical landmarks, the orientation and planes of the human body, axes of movement and types of movement. A background in natural sciences is helpful. Prerequisite: one 100-level biology or chemistry course. Offered every fall.

Due to the nature of physical education, health and sport studies at Kenyon, individual studies are rarely approved and only under extenuating circumstances. They will be approved by formal petition to the coordinator for physical education and lifetime fitness. Documentation of the circumstances justifying a proposed individual study must be included with the petition. You will work closely with your mentor to develop a course syllabus. The syllabus must outline a schedule of weekly meetings, weekly readings and a set of assignments, which is to include one to two 10-page papers, depending on the amount of credit to be awarded, and a 15-20 minute presentation. All materials must be submitted to the coordinator for physical education and lifetime fitness prior to the first day of the semester. For complete guidelines and requirements to submit a petition, please contact the coordinator for physical education and lifetime fitness. Petitions without verifiable need will be declined. Individual studies in health and sport studies are intended to provide the student with the opportunity to pursue an independent investigation of a topic of special interest not covered, or not covered in depth, in the current curriculum. Individual studies will be worth 0.13 or 0.25 units only. Students may receive credit for no more than one individual study in the department. This credit does not count toward the total of 0.50 physical education credits allowable toward graduation. Because students must enroll for individual studies by the end of the seventh class day of each semester, they should begin discussion of the proposed individual study preferably the semester before, so that there is time to devise the proposal and seek departmental approval before the registrar’s deadline. No prerequisite.

This course features a program of fitness activities, designed by the student and a member of the physical education faculty. The student and faculty member develop fitness goals and strategies (activities and a schedule) to reach those goals. Class time is spent completing various fitness tests and workouts and students will keep a training log throughout the course. The student will become familiar with principles of fitness and basic self-assessment techniques. No prerequisite. Offered every semester.

This course provides students with the knowledge and skills to obtain lifeguard certification, including CPR, first aid and water rescue. Successful completion of the course results in a Red Cross certificate. The course runs for the full semester. There is a charge for Red Cross instructional materials. Intermediate or advanced level of swimming proficiency required. No prerequisite. Offered every fall.

The course is designed for participants with all levels of experience. Basic techniques, mechanics and tactical considerations are taught in an environment where the activity itself is the teaching tool. A brief history of the activity and safety considerations for the participant before and during play will be presented. Physical preparation for play, technical performance and tactical strategies will be introduced within the context of the physiological principles and laws of movement. No prerequisite. Offered every spring.

The course is designed for participants with all levels of experience. Basic techniques, mechanics and tactical considerations are taught in an environment where the activity itself is the teaching tool. A brief history of the activity and safety considerations for the participant before and during play will be presented. Physical preparation for play, technical performance and tactical strategies will be introduced within the context of the physiological principles and laws of movement. No prerequisite. Offered in the first and second half of every fall semester.

This course is designed to provide the student with the basis for a lifetime of activity. Running is an ideal form of fitness training. It provides health and wellness benefits, requires minimal equipment and can be done nearly anywhere. The student will learn technique and form, basic training programs and safety. A portion of each class will be spent building endurance and speed through running workouts that will vary depending upon the fitness level of the student. Throughout the course, the student will keep a training journal, logging weekly mileage, nutrition and weekly goals. At the end of the course, the students will compete in a 5K race, either for recreation or competitively. No prerequisite. Offered in the second half of the spring semester.

The course is designed to introduce the basic techniques and principles of strength training through the use of Nautilus and free weight equipment. Physiological principles of isokinetic, isotonic and isometric training will be developed. Safe and appropriate methods of equipment use will be emphasized. No prerequisite. Offered in the first half of every semester.

The primary objective of this course is to help students develop an understanding of the principles, techniques and strategies for increasing total body conditioning with an emphasis on agility, anaerobic power development and the enhancement of aerobic capacity. Students will learn skills that can be applied to lifetime physical activity as well as to enhance their advanced athletic skills. They will develop an understanding of training principles and experience training benefits, including increases in muscular power, brain signal efficiency, kinesthetic or body spatial awareness, motor skills and reaction time. Prerequisite: PHSD 110 or 132 or a current varsity athlete with permission of instructor. Offered every semester.

This course is designed for participants with all levels of experience. Basic fundamentals and techniques of the game are taught. The strategy of the game is explored and individualized to the student. Successful completion of the course will result in an understanding and appreciation of the game. No prerequisite. Offered in the first half of the fall semester and the second half of the spring semester.

This class is designed to prepare the student to take the American Red Cross CPR and first-aid certification tests. The student will learn to safely and effectively care for adult, child and infant victims of cardiopulmonary emergencies including choking; cuts, scrapes and bruises; burns; muscle, bone or joint injuries; sudden illnesses; and poisoning. The student will be able to demonstrate proper precautions to guard against blood-borne illness. Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be eligible to take the American Red Cross certification tests for the above listed skills. There is a charge for Red Cross instructional materials. No prerequisite. Offered in the second half of every semester.