Sarah Blick teaches courses on medieval and Asian art history. In addition to her intermediate courses on early medieval art, Romanesque and Gothic art, late Gothic art, and art of China, she offers more specialized upper-level courses, such as the Parish Church in Late Medieval England and Used Books: Medieval Manuscripts and Incunabula.

She has published widely on pilgrim souvenirs and the cult of St. Thomas Becket of Canterbury Cathedral. She enjoys editing and has published (as editor) several volumes of scholarly essays devoted to late medieval art and Peregrinations: Journal of Medieval Art & Architecture for the International Society for the Study of Pilgrimage ArtShe is co-editor of Art and Material Culture of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, a book series published by Brill Press, Leiden. Her current research focuses on late Gothic parish church baptismal font covers and devotional practices.

Areas of Expertise

Medieval art history, Asian art history.

Education

1994 — Doctor of Philosophy from Univ Kansas

1990 — Master of Arts from Univ Minnesota Minneapolis*

1985 — Bachelor of Arts from Univ Akron

Courses Recently Taught

This course surveys Western art and architecture from the Paleolithic era to the end of the Middle Ages. Training in visual analysis is emphasized, as are the historical context, religious beliefs and social conditions in which the artwork was produced. This is primarily a lecture class, though discussion is encouraged. Requirements include examinations and short papers. This counts toward the introductory course requirement for the major. No prerequisite. Offered every semester.

This course explores the highlights of Asian art, focusing on India, China and Japan. The class also will briefly cover Central Asia, Bengal, Nepal, Tibet, Thailand, Cambodia, Java and Korea. Buddhism, Hinduism, Confucianism, Taoism and other Asian beliefs will be explained in the context of how they affect Asian art. Types of artwork examined will include painting, sculpture, decorative arts and some architecture. Class requirements include four one-hour slide examinations and other assignments. This counts toward the introductory course requirement for the major. No prerequisite.

This course concerns the arts of medieval Europe from the fourth to the 10th centuries. The class will learn about the major forms of architecture, sculpture, painting and the decorative arts of the Middle Ages. Style and iconography will be considered within the cultural context of large societal movements, including monastic reform and pilgrimage. The secondary focus will be on information literacy and how to develop and write a research paper. The class format consists of lecture, discussion, debate and presentations. This counts toward the intermediate course and Medieval art requirements for the major. Prerequisite: any 100-level ARHS course.

This course examines the extraordinary arts of China from the Paleolithic period (4000 BCE) through the 20th century. The class will learn about the rich traditions of jade, bronzes, lacquer, ceramics, textiles, painting, calligraphy, sculpture and architecture within their cultural context. Various forms of Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism, Legalism and other beliefs will be explained in conjunction with how they affect Chinese art. This is primarily a lecture class, but discussion is encouraged. This counts toward the intermediate course requirement for the major. Prerequisite: Any 100-level ARHS course or previous coursework in Asian studies.

This course explores the arts of medieval northern Europe from the mid-13th through the early 16th centuries. The class will learn about the rich traditions of architecture, sculpture, painting and the decorative arts from the Late Gothic period. Style and iconography will be considered within the cultural context of large societal movements, including literacy, pilgrimage and chivalry. The class format will consist of lecture, discussion, debate and class presentations. The secondary focus will be on information literacy and how to develop and write a research paper. This counts toward the intermediate course and Medieval art requirements for the major. Prerequisite: Any 100-level ARHS course.

Normally, students may enroll in an individual study only if they have taken all the courses offered by the department in that particular area of the curriculum. Exceptions to this rule are at the discretion of the instructor with the support of the department. Individual study is considered an advanced course and, as such, the work produced should be the equivalent of a seminar or high-level intermediate class. A grade point average of 3.0 minimum in art history courses is required. Exceptions to this rule are at the discretion of the instructor with the consent of the department. The professor and the student should establish and agree on the extent and nature of the work required for the individual study. This may take several forms: several short papers, one long paper, one in-depth project (small exhibition or assisting in doing research for an exhibition), a large (and lengthy) generalized outline and annotated bibliography, public presentations and so on. The student and the professor should meet on a regular basis. The frequency is to be determined by the professor in consultation with the student. Students must seek the permission of the instructor before enrolling. Individual study is undertaken at the discretion of the instructor and must be approved by the department. Individual study can be used toward credit for the major and the minor in Art History. Because students must enroll for individual studies by the end of the seventh class day of each semester, they should begin discussion of the proposed individual study preferably the semester before, so that there is time to devise the proposal and seek departmental approval before the registrar’s deadline.

Honors is for students with demonstrated ability to work on a research project under the supervision of a faculty member. Minimum 3.33 cumulative GPA and a minimum 3.5 major GPA. Students undertaking an honors thesis must have had at least one (and preferably two) intermediate or advanced courses at Kenyon in the topic area. Endorsement of the project by the proposed thesis advisor is mandatory before submitting an application for honors. Previous completion of a research paper in art history (preferably in the area of honors specialization) is essential. Meeting the minimum GPA does not automatically qualify a student for Honors. Typically, if a student has written an exceptionally well-researched and well-written art history paper, and meets the other criteria for acceptance into Honors, a professor might suggest that the student undertake a related topic as an honors thesis. Alternately, students can discuss pursuing an honors thesis with their academic advisor and a potential thesis advisor. The project must be supervised by an art history professor who agrees and is available to serve as the honors thesis advisor and whose interests and expertise coincide with the proposed project. In either case, the student then works closely with the thesis advisor to develop a project proposal to be submitted to the art history faculty. Departmental approval must be obtained during the spring semester preceding work on the thesis. Permission of instructor and department chair are required.

Honors is for students with demonstrated ability to work on a research project under the supervision of a faculty member. Minimum 3.33 cumulative GPA and a minimum 3.5 major GPA. Students undertaking an honors thesis must have had at least one (and preferably two) intermediate or advanced courses at Kenyon in the topic area. Endorsement of the project by the proposed thesis advisor is mandatory before submitting an application for honors. Previous completion of a research paper in art history (preferably in the area of honors specialization) is essential. Meeting the minimum GPA does not automatically qualify a student for Honors. Typically, if a student has written an exceptionally well-researched and well-written art history paper, and meets the other criteria for acceptance into Honors, a professor might suggest that the student undertake a related topic as an honors thesis. Alternately, students can discuss pursuing an honors thesis with their academic advisor and a potential thesis advisor. The project must be supervised by an art history professor who agrees and is available to serve as the honors thesis advisor and whose interests and expertise coincide with the proposed project. In either case, the student then works closely with the thesis advisor to develop a project proposal to be submitted to the art history faculty. Departmental approval must be obtained during the spring semester preceding work on the thesis. Permission of instructor and department chair are required.