A 1989 Kenyon graduate, Gordon Loveland majored in physics while completing honors research on light scattering in highly chiral liquid crystals. He then went on to earn a master’s degree in physics at Lehigh University while performing research in non-linear optics on degenerate four wave mixing.  

After teaching physics at The Hill School in Pottstown, Pa for five years, he took a similar position at University School on the east side of Cleveland, OH.   Over a seventeen year span he held the position of science chairman and taught in Kenyon's KAP physics program.  

Education

1991 — Master of Science from Lehigh University

1989 — Bachelor of Arts from Kenyon College

Courses Recently Taught

Nuclear power produces needed energy, but nuclear waste threatens our future. Nuclear weapons make us strong, but dirty bombs make us vulnerable. Nuclear medicine can cure us, but nuclear radiation can kill us. Radiocarbon dating tells us about the past, but it can challenge religious faith. This course is designed to give each student the scientific knowledge necessary to understand and participate in public discussions of nuclear issues. The concepts include classification of nuclei, the types of energy (radiation) released in nuclear reactions, the interactions of that radiation with matter, including human health effects, and the design of nuclear reactors and nuclear weapons. Hands-on demonstrations and experiments will explore radioactive decay, antimatter, transmutation of atoms, nuclear detectors and interactions of radiation with matter. We will apply the core concepts to understanding contemporary issues, such as electric power generation using nuclear energy, including its environmental effects; advances in nuclear medicine; the challenges of preventing nuclear weapons proliferation; the threat of "dirty bombs"; and dating the universe. We also will cover the history of the Manhattan Project and the use of nuclear weapons that brought an end to World War II. The course will offer a field trip to at least one significant nuclear site in Ohio. This course is designed to be accessible to any student. No prerequisite.

This laboratory course meets one afternoon each week and is organized around weekly experiments that explore the phenomena of wave phenomena, geometrical and physical optics, elementary quantum theory, atomic physics, X-rays, radioactivity, nuclear physics and thermodynamics. Lectures cover the theory and instrumentation required to understand each experiment. Students will continue to develop skills in computer-assisted graphical and statistical analysis of data as well as the analysis of experimental uncertainty. Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in PHYS 135. Offered every fall.

This laboratory course is a corequisite for all students enrolled in PHYS 135 or 145. The course meets one afternoon each week and is organized around weekly experiments demonstrating the phenomena of waves, optics, X-rays, and atomic and nuclear physics. Lectures cover the theory and instrumentation required to understand each experiment. Experimental techniques include the use of lasers, X-ray diffraction and fluorescence, optical spectroscopy, and nuclear counting and spectroscopy. Students are introduced to computer-assisted graphical and statistical analysis of data, as well as the analysis of experimental uncertainty. Prerequisite: PHYS 131 or 141 and concurrent enrollment in PHYS 145. Offered every spring.

This laboratory course is a corequisite for all upperclass students enrolled in PHYS 240. The course is organized around experiments demonstrating various phenomena associated with the special theory of relativity and electric and magnetic fields. Lectures cover the theory and instrumentation required to understand each experiment. Laboratory work emphasizes computerized acquisition and analysis of data, the use of a wide variety of modern instrumentation and the analysis of experimental uncertainty. Prerequisite: PHYS 140 and 141 or equivalent and concurrent enrollment in PHYS 240. Offered every fall.

This course will introduce the theory behind concepts covered in the first year of the Kenyon physics curriculum and will enable the performance of experiments in those areas. Topics will include kinematics, dynamics, impulse and momentum, work and energy, electricity, circuits, atomic physics and nuclear physics. The course will be taught using a combination of lectures, labs, in-class exercises, homework assignments and examinations. Seven full (three-hour) labs will be performed along with supporting activities. Lectures cover the theory and instrumentation required to understand each experiment. Students will continue to develop skills in computer-assisted graphical and statistical analysis of data. The final exam will be an in-lab exam similar to those performed during the Kenyon academic year. Knowledge of calculus is not required. Prerequisite: Acceptance into Camp 4. Offered every Camp 4 session.