Daniel Hartnett joined the Kenyon faculty in 2009. He received his Ph.D. in Spanish from the University of Virginia with his dissertation focusing on the political and social uses of Dante in 15th century Iberia. He has lived and studied in Paris and St. Malo, France; Salamanca and San Sebastian, Spain; and Coimbra and Lisbon, Portugal.

Hartnett's primary research interests involve the medieval, renaissance and baroque literature of Spain and Portugal. He travels often and encourages his students to do the same. In his free time, Dan is an avid cellist and cook. He is from rural western New York.

Areas of Expertise

Medieval court poetry, early modern Iberian gender studies, transcultural Mediterranean exchanges.

Education

2009 — Doctor of Philosophy from University of Virginia

2003 — Master of Arts from University of Virginia

1999 — Bachelor of Arts from Wabash College

Courses Recently Taught

The course is team-taught by two faculty members from English and MLL. It explores what it means to read world literature by focusing on a single theme or problem common to many cultures that takes different forms in each local environment. For example, the course might focus on the problem of migrations to see how global literary forms have found different ways to represent what happens when people move from place to place. Or the course might focus on the different ways of representing coming of age. Yet another theme that the course might explore centers on the Anthropocene and how the environment is figured across cultures. Earlier iterations of the course have focused on travel, print cultures and book history, and global poetry; consequently, readings may include “Gilgamesh,” Laila Lalami’s “The Moor’s Account,” Aphra Behn’s “Oroonoko,” Marco Polo’s “The Travels” and Thomas Pynchon’s “The Crying of Lot 49.” This course paired with any CWL course counts towards the Humanities diversification requirement. These courses must be taken at Kenyon. Prerequisite: CWL 220 or permission of instructor. Offered every other spring.

This first half of a yearlong course is focused on the self in a broader social context for students who are beginning the study of Spanish or who have had minimal exposure to the language. The course offers the equivalent of conventional beginning and intermediate language study. The first semester's work comprises an introduction to Spanish as a spoken and written language. The work includes practice in understanding and using the spoken language. Written exercises and reading materials serve to reinforce communicative skills, build vocabulary and enhance discussion of the individual and community. This course includes required practice sessions with an apprentice teacher (AT), which will be scheduled at the beginning of the semester. Students enrolled in this course will be automatically added to SPAN 112Y for the spring semester. No prerequisite. Offered every year.

This second half of a yearlong course is a continuation of SPAN 111Y. The second semester consists of and continued study of the fundamentals of Spanish, while incorporating literary and cultural materials to develop techniques of reading, cultural awareness, and mastery of the spoken and written language. The work includes practice in understanding and using the spoken language. Written exercises and reading materials serve to reinforce communicative skills, build vocabulary and enhance discussion of the individual and community. This course includes required practice sessions with an apprentice teacher (AT), which will be scheduled at the beginning of the semester. Prerequisite: SPAN 111Y or equivalent. Offered every year.

This first half of the yearlong intermediate-level language course is focused on language and culture for students who are interested in developing their ability to speak, read, write and understand Spanish. In addition to a comprehensive grammar review, the primary texts chosen for the course serve as a general introduction to Hispanic culture and literature. Other materials include short essays, newspaper articles, films, television series and songs, which together will provide a point of departure for discussions on a range of issues. This course includes required practice sessions with an apprentice teacher (AT), which will be scheduled at the beginning of the semester. Students enrolled in this course will automatically be added to SPAN 214Y for the spring semester. Prerequisite: SPAN 111Y-112Y or equivalent. Offered every year.

This second half of the yearlong intermediate-level language course builds on the concepts and skills addressed in the first semester, with a continued focus on language and culture for students who are interested in developing their ability to speak, read, write and understand Spanish. Students will be exposed to more complex Spanish grammar, while also expanding their vocabulary in context, using authentic materials similar to those of the first semester (including short novels, stories, essays, newspaper articles, films, television series, and songs). Students will produce more advanced analytic and creative writing assignments, and will be asked to actively discuss a range of challenging topics in class with increased proficiency (compared to fall semester). Like SPAN 213Y, this course includes required practice sessions with an apprentice teacher (AT), though the days and times for these may be different from the fall semester. Prerequisite: SPAN 213Y or equivalent. Offered every year.

This course offers a close reading of the "Quijote" with particular emphasis on Cervantes' contribution to the novel form, the comic hero and the anti-hero, the interplay of fiction and history, and the confusion of appearance and reality. The novel will be studied in its social and historical context. Prerequisite: one unit of Spanish or Spanish American literature or permission of instructor. Generally offered every three years.

This course invites students to explore some of the great works of literature produced in Spain during the 16th and 17th centuries. We will read poems by Fray Luis de León, Garcilaso de la Vega, Francisco de Quevedo, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Lope de Vega and Luis de Góngora; religious prose by Santa Teresa de Jesús; plays by Lope de Vega and Tirso de Molina; and short novels by Miguel de Cervantes and María de Zayas. Textual analysis will be stressed, but we also will consider the social, economic and political realities that helped to shape literary and artistic production during this period. Prerequisite: SPAN 321 or equivalent. Generally offered every three years.

Where did that word come from and what does it really mean? This is a common question that we ask ourselves or our teachers at some point in our Spanish education. The first part of this course will address this question and many others as it discusses the development of the Spanish language from Latin to Old Castilian to modern Spanish. The second part of the course will provide students with an opportunity to apply their knowledge of the development of Spanish to the earliest manifestations of Castilian literature. Through a variety of activities they also will gain an understanding of some of the difficulties faced by scholars and students alike when interpreting these works. Students will read parts of the following texts in the original Old Spanish: a selection of romances, El poema del mío Cid, "Los Milagros de Nuestra Señora," "El Libro de Buen Amor," "El Conde Lucanor," a selection of poesía cancioneril and "La Celestina." Prerequisite: SPAN 321 or equivalent. Generally offered every three years.