Anton Dudley joined Kenyon’s community in 2018. His creative scholarship exists in directing and writing for the theatre, including plays, musicals and opera libretti. Dudley’s work has premiered Off-Broadway at Second Stage Theater, Cherry Lane Theater, Playwrights Realm and Theater Row, as well as at theaters across the U.S., Germany and Canada, including LaJolla Playhouse, Williamstown Theatre Festival, Signature Theater, Walnut Street Theater and Houston Grand Opera. His work is published by Sam French, Playscripts, Applause, Heuer, Heinemann Press, Backstage Books, Smith & Kraus and Vintage. He was a finalist for the 2012 Lambda Literary Award in LGBT Drama and co-recipient of the 1998 Helen Hayes Awards for both Outstanding Resident Musical and Direction.

Dudley teaches courses in directing for the stage, writing lyrics for musical theatre and dramatic literature.

Areas of Expertise

Directing, playwriting, musical theater

Education

2001 — Master of Fine Arts from New York University

1996 — Bachelor of Arts from Vassar College

Courses Recently Taught

The work of this course involves the realization in the theater of the efforts of an important playwright, as expressed in the text for a particular play. Problems in textual analysis, historical research and the creation of a production lead, by way of independent and cooperative activity involving acting, design and special problems, to public performance before an audience. Note: Students who, in the judgment of the instructional and directorial staff, have made significant creative contributions to the effectiveness of the production will have "audit" indicated on their academic record. No credit is awarded for an audited course.

This course examines how theater differs from other arts and how various theatrical artists bring a play to life. Through a series of creative assignments, we explore what a play is and how it's structured. Assignments consist of a series of playwriting projects and one acting project, which students perform while collaborating with their classmates. Students read at least five plays and a series of essays about the theory and practice of he theater. Each student writes, directs and presents a final short play and take a final exam. Any student with an interest in the theater will find this a challenging course, regardless of previous experience. Because this course is an introduction to the vocabulary of the theater, it is a prerequisite to most other courses in the department. Required for drama and film majors. No prerequisite. Offered every year.

This course surveys the history of Western dramatic literature from 1700 through the 1980's. The emphasis is on critical reading for a theatrical understanding of these seminal texts. This course consists of lecture, discussions sessions and critical writing assignments. Required for drama majors. Prerequisite: DRAM 111.

This course studies the major theatrical movements of the first half of the 20th century, emphasizing plays as they were performed in the theater of the time. Work will include readings, discussions, written assignments, projects and lectures. This counts toward the stage and its plays requirement for the major. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Generally offered every third year.

This course examines the work of the director, starting with the visual aspects of storytelling and moving into the analysis of plays and how to make them legible on stage. Work includes directed scenes, exercises, written assignments, readings, discussion and lectures. This counts toward the elements requirement for the major. Prerequisite: DRAM 111. Generally offered every year.

This course examines the work of the director, starting with the visual aspects of storytelling and moving into the analysis of plays and how to make them legible on stage. Work includes directed scenes, exercises, written assignments, readings, discussion and lectures. This counts toward the elements requirement for the major. Prerequisite: DRAM 111. Generally offered every year.

This course continues an investigation, from the director's point of view, of the creation of live theater from dramatic texts. Students will direct scenes and excerpts from a broad range of texts including contemporary realist and non-realist plays, verse plays, and new works. We will emphasize the role of the director in collaboration with actors as well as other key relationships such as those with designers and playwrights. Work will include directed projects, written assignments and reading. This counts toward the elements requirement for the major and an elective for the film major. Prerequisite: DRAM 261. Generally offered every other year.

This course focuses on the collaboration between directors and actors in the creation of live theater from dramatic texts. Students enroll in the course either as a director (DRAM 362A) or an actor (DRAM 362B), collaborating on scenes and excerpts from a broad range of texts including both realist and non-realist plays, verse plays and new works. We will emphasize the role of collaboration and the creation of shared vocabularies and rehearsal processes, as well as consider other key relationships such as those with designers and playwrights. Work will include rehearsed projects, written assignments and reading. This counts toward the elements requirement for the major and an elective for the film major. Prerequisite: for directors, DRAM 261; for actors, DRAM 111. Generally offered every other year.

This course focuses on the collaboration between directors and actors in the creation of live theater from dramatic texts. Students enroll in the course either as a director (DRAM 362A) or an actor (DRAM 362B), collaborating on scenes and excerpts from a broad range of texts including both realist and non-realist plays, verse plays and new works. We will emphasize the role of collaboration and the creation of shared vocabularies and rehearsal processes, as well as consider other key relationships such as those with designers and playwrights. Work will include rehearsed projects, written assignments and reading. This counts toward the elements requirement for the major and an elective for the film major. Prerequisite: for directors, DRAM 261; for actors, DRAM 111. Generally offered every other year.

Individual study in drama is reserved for students exploring a topic not regularly offered in the department's curriculum. Typically, the course will carry .5 unit of credit. To enroll in an individual study, a student must identify a member of the department willing to direct the project and, in consultation with him or her, write a proposal. The department chair must approve the proposal. The one- to two-page proposal should include a preliminary bibliography and/or set of specific problems, goals and tasks for the course; outline a schedule of reading and/or writing assignments or creative undertakings and describe the methods of assessment (e.g., a journal to be submitted for evaluation weekly, a one-act play due at semester's end, with drafts due at given intervals, and so on). The student also should briefly describe prior coursework which qualifies him or her for this independent project. At a minimum, the department expects the student to meet regularly with the instructor one hour per week and to submit an amount of work equivalent to that required in 300-level dance and drama courses. Students are urged to begin discussion of their proposed individual study the semester before they hope to enroll, so that they can devise a proposal and seek departmental approval before the deadline.