Carolin Hahnemann joined Kenyon’s faculty in 2002. Her passion is teaching Greek and Mythology. In her research she seeks to shed light on aspects of ancient masterworks that are not readily accessible in translation, such as gestures and laughter. Thus Hahnemann has traced the relationship between Antigone and Ismene in Sophocles’ play through the forms of address they use for each other. The publication of Alice Oswald’s award-winning poem “Memorial. An Excavation of the Iliad” prompted Hahnemann to organize numerous recitations of the poem. She has also published several articles on the poem’s relationship to Homer on the one hand and to modern war memorials one the other. Hahnemann is a winner of Kenyon's Trustee Teaching Excellence Award.

Areas of Expertise

Greek tragedy, Homer, modern poems based on Classical myths

Education

1997 — Doctor of Philosophy from Brown University

1994 — Master of Arts from Brown University

1990 — Bacchalaureat from Hochschule fuer Philosophie

Courses Recently Taught

It is impossible to understand the cultures of the West without some knowledge of classical mythology. Not only are some myths wildly entertaining, they permeate popular imagination and life to this day. This course focuses on the evidence from ancient Greece and Rome but may also include material from other traditions. Class discussion will explore some of the overarching themes contained within the myths themselves and also how these stories have influenced modern culture through literature and art. At the same time, students will have a chance to observe how the treatment of different myths changes from author to author, thus revealing what issues were important to the people who told them. This course fulfils a core course requirement for the major. No prerequisite. Offered every year.

The use of language constitutes one of the defining characteristics of our species. This course provides an introduction to the academic field devoted to the scientific study of this distinctly human faculty, linguistics, by offering a survey of the basic terms and concepts that make up its main subfields, including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics. In addition, we will explore in some depth the ways in which different languages have changed and evolved over time, with a special focus on the ones that, like English, belong to the Indo-European family. The course will include lectures and discussions, readings from two textbooks and regular research reports. Students from all language backgrounds are welcome. No prerequisites. This course can be counted toward the Classics major as well as toward the interdisciplinary Track III of the MLL major as explained in the Course Catalog. Offered every three years.

In this capstone course, the content of which will change on a regular basis, students will study closely a particular topic in classics that benefits from an investigation based on a wide range of approaches (e.g., literary, historical, archaeological). The course seeks to further students' skills in written and verbal communication. Each student will write a major research paper on a subject related to the topic of the seminar and will outline the results of his or her inquiry in an oral presentation. This course is required of and restricted to classics majors and minors in their senior year. Offered every year.

This yearlong course prepares students to read Ancient Greek literature in its original form. The first semester and the first half of the second semester will consist of readings and exercises from a textbook designed to help students build a working vocabulary and learn the extensive and subtle grammar of this language. In addition, twice a week students will translate a short piece of authentic Greek, appreciating its artistry and situating it in its cultural context. After spring break, the hard work of the preceding months will be rewarded with the opportunity to read Plato's dialogue "Crito" or another text written in Attic prose. The course is taught in English and does not presuppose any knowledge either of Ancient Greek or of grammatical terminology. Students enrolled in this course will be automatically added to GREK 112Y for the spring semester. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of the major. No prerequisite. Offered every year.

This yearlong course prepares students to read Ancient Greek literature in its original form. The first semester and the first half of the second semester will consist of readings and exercises from a textbook designed to help students build a working vocabulary and learn the extensive and subtle grammar of this language. In addition, twice a week students will translate a short piece of authentic Greek, appreciating its artistry and situating it in its cultural context. After spring break, the hard work of the preceding months will be rewarded with the opportunity to read Plato's dialogue "Crito" or another text written in Attic prose. The course is taught in English and does not presuppose any knowledge either of Ancient Greek or of grammatical terminology. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of the major. No prerequisite. Offered every year.

It is a great pleasure to read Homer in Greek, and this course seeks to help students do so with accuracy and insight. Students will acquire a working knowledge of Homer's vocabulary and syntax and will explore some of the key literary and historical questions that have occupied his readers. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of the major. Offered every spring.

Students will improve their skills in reading Greek and discuss scholarship on the author or authors being read that semester. Each semester the readings change, so that GREK 301 and 302 can be taken, to the student's advantage, several times. Students are encouraged to inform the instructor in advance if there is a particular genre, author or theme they would especially like to study. The list of authors taught in this course includes, to name just a few, the lyric poets; the playwrights Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides and Aristophanes; and great prose stylists such as Plato and Thucydides. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of the major. Offered every spring.

Individual study in Greek allows students to study texts not covered or minimally covered in existing courses. To be eligible for an individual study, a student must also concurrently enroll in the advanced Greek course offered during the semester in which the individual study is to take place. If this is impossible, the student must petition for an exemption in the proposal to the department. To enroll in an individual study, a student should meet with an appropriate faculty member for a preliminary discussion of the project. If the faculty member is willing to supervise the study, then the student must submit a proposal by email to all members of the department on campus. Departmental approval is required for the individual study to proceed. If the proposal is approved, the student should take the initiative in designing the course and, in consultation with the supervisor, develop a syllabus. The student and supervisor should meet at least one hour each week. For an individual study worth 0.5 units, the workload must be equivalent, at minimum, to that encountered in an advanced Greek course. For individual studies worth 0.25 units, the work should be approximately half that encountered in such a course. Because students must enroll for individual studies by the end of the seventh class day of each semester, they should begin discussion of the proposed individual study preferably the semester before, so that there is time to devise the proposal and seek departmental approval before the registrar's deadline.\n