Tatjana Longerot received an M.F.A. degree in costume design from The Ohio State University. There she was awarded two of six USITT Peggy Ezekiel Awards for excellent and outstanding achievement in the theatre arts.

Since graduation she has been working as a freelance costume designer (for stage and film), stylist, wardrobe master (local crew for tours include: 42nd Street, Jesus Christ Superstar, The Rolling Stones, Aerosmith, Elton John), makeup artist and wig master.

Her professional costume designs include: The Elixir of Love (OSU Opera), Homebody/Kabul (Denison University), The Wild Party and The Greeks (Otterbein University), CATCO’s The Clean House, The Piano Lesson (honored by the Central Ohio Theatre Critics Circle for “Best Production of a Play” and “Best Design”), The Pillowman (“Best Overall Design”, COTCC), Evil Dead the Musical and Bengal Tiger at the Baghdad Zoo, and Short North Stage’s productions of Passing Strange, Fugitive Songs and I’ll Eat You Last.

As costume studio manager she has worked at Indiana University South Bend, Saint Mary’s College and at the Contemporary American Theatre Company in Columbus, Ohio.

Areas of Expertise

Costume design, costume construction, makeup design.

Education

2002 — Master of Fine Arts from The Ohio State University

1996 — Bachelor of Arts from Indiana University South Bend

Courses Recently Taught

This course examines how theater differs from other arts and how various theatrical artists bring a play to life. Through a series of creative assignments, we explore what a play is and how it's structured. Assignments consist of a series of playwriting projects and one acting project, which students perform while collaborating with their classmates. Students read at least five plays and a series of essays about the theory and practice of he theater. Each student writes, directs and presents a final short play and take a final exam. Any student with an interest in the theater will find this a challenging course, regardless of previous experience. Because this course is an introduction to the vocabulary of the theater, it is a prerequisite to most other courses in the department. Required for drama and film majors. No prerequisite. Offered every year.

A fully realized theatrical production of a play is a lengthy process which engages numerous artists of many disciplines in an extraordinary collaborative effort to help create "the world of the play" and to help bring to life the characters, along with the actors. The course aims to serve as a foundation for young theater artists by offering insight into how thorough script analysis, the examination of given circumstances and character analysis can be translated into visual and audible elements of the mise-en-scène. In addition, the course will help students develop a universal vocabulary of theater and design terminology and an understanding of theatrical venues and equipment. It also enables first-year students to successfully engage in being a valued member of a production team in any capacity. This counts toward the elements requirement for the major. DRAM 111 is recommended. Permission of instructor required. No prerequisite. Offered every spring.

This course surveys the history of Western clothing and fashion from the ancient world to the present day. Work will include papers, oral presentations, lectures and discussion. This counts toward the three departmental electives required for the major. Permission of instructor required. Generally offered every other year.

This course presents an introduction to the costume designer's creative process. Through a series of projects, students will explore the relation of the costume to the character, the plot, the work of the director, the actor and the other designers. Projects involve drawing, painting, collage, writing and research. This counts toward the elements requirement for the major. DRAM 111 recommended. Permission of instructor required. Generally offered every year.

This course presents an introduction to the costume designer's creative process. Through a series of projects, students will explore the relation of the costume to the character, the plot, the work of the director, the actor and the other designers. Projects involve drawing, painting, collage, writing and research. This counts toward the elements requirement for the major. DRAM 111 recommended. Permission of instructor required. Generally offered every year.

The face is the actor's most important tool in communicating the character's intent. This course teaches how the art and craft of theatrical makeup can be used to project students' facial features on stage and film, as well as how to visualize the determinants of a character's physical appearance. In addition to the assimilation and projection of the character in terms of age, environment and health, the course also explores the psychological support makeup can give the actor. Students will analyze the makeup design of characters in 5 to 6 plays. Students will apply makeup to themselves during laboratory exercises and for project adjudication. Students are evaluated on how well they have prepared to do a daily exercise. Students are evaluated on their progress and improvement at executing a technique once they have practiced it and received critical feedback. Students will also evaluate their own and each other's designs and makeup applications. This counts toward the elements requirement for the major. Permission of instructor is required. No prerequisite. Generally offered every other year.

Individual study in drama is reserved for students exploring a topic not regularly offered in the department's curriculum. Typically, the course will carry .5 unit of credit. To enroll in an individual study, a student must identify a member of the department willing to direct the project and, in consultation with him or her, write a proposal. The department chair must approve the proposal. The one- to two-page proposal should include a preliminary bibliography and/or set of specific problems, goals and tasks for the course; outline a schedule of reading and/or writing assignments or creative undertakings and describe the methods of assessment (e.g., a journal to be submitted for evaluation weekly, a one-act play due at semester's end, with drafts due at given intervals, and so on). The student also should briefly describe prior coursework which qualifies him or her for this independent project. At a minimum, the department expects the student to meet regularly with the instructor one hour per week and to submit an amount of work equivalent to that required in 300-level dance and drama courses. Students are urged to begin discussion of their proposed individual study the semester before they hope to enroll, so that they can devise a proposal and seek departmental approval before the deadline.