Kathryn Crim's research forges a critical dialogue between late modern and early modern poetry and poetics, with a concentration on the aesthetic legacy of the Protestant Reformation for later devotional, empiricist, and artistic practices. Her interests include the history of science; social, economic and aesthetic histories of capitalism; feminism and social reproduction theory. 

Crim's dissertation, "Fit and Counterfeit: Toward a Documentary Aesthetic," develops an account of documentary attention from John Foxe's "Book of Martyrs" to Robert Hooke's "Micrographia." Her current project, "The Pretext of Poetry," aims to show how poetic decorum plays a key role in the interwined discourses of natural history and the history of labor — from the late-sixteenth-century Paracelsian poet Thomas Moffett to the contemporary artist Jen Bervin.

Areas of Expertise

Early modern; poetics; critical theory

Education

2021 — Doctor of Philosophy from Univ. of California Berkeley

— Bachelor of Arts from Wesleyan University

Courses Recently Taught

Each section of these first-year seminars approaches the study of literature through the exploration of a single theme in texts drawn from a variety of literary genres (such as tragedy, comedy, lyric poetry, epic, novel, short story, film and autobiography) and historical periods. Classes are small, offering intensive discussion and close attention to each student's writing. Students in each section are asked to work intensively on composition as part of a rigorous introduction to reading, thinking, speaking and writing about literary texts. During the semester, instructors will assign frequent essays and may also require oral presentations, quizzes, examinations and research projects. This course is not open to juniors and seniors without permission of the department chair. Offered every year.

Each section of these first-year seminars approaches the study of literature through the exploration of a single theme in texts drawn from a variety of literary genres (such as tragedy, comedy, lyric poetry, epic, novel, short story, film and autobiography) and historical periods. Classes are small, offering intensive discussion and close attention to each student's writing. Students in each section are asked to work intensively on composition as part of a rigorous introduction to reading, thinking, speaking and writing about literary texts. During the semester, instructors will assign frequent essays and may also require oral presentations, quizzes, examinations and research projects. This course is not open to juniors and seniors without permission of department chair. Offered every year.

The Reformation deeply influenced the literary development of England and transformed the religious, intellectual and cultural worlds of the 16th and 17th centuries. The long process of Reformation, shaped by late-medieval piety, the Renaissance, Continental activists, and popular religion, illustrates both religious continuities and discontinuities in the works of poets and prelates, prayer books and propaganda, sermons and exorcisms, bibles and broadsheets. This interdisciplinary course will focus on a range of English literary texts, from the humanists under early Tudor monarchs to the flowering of Renaissance writers in the Elizabethan and Stuart eras, in the context of religious history, poetry, drama, prose and iconography. Writers and reformers such as More, Erasmus, Cranmer, Shakespeare, Marlowe, Southwell, Herbert and Donne will be examined. This counts toward the pre-1700 requirement for the major. This course is the same as RLST 331. Prerequisite: junior standing or ENGL 210-291 or permission of instructor.

This course will examine the poetry of England's most radical age, a period of revolution, religious dissent and the birth of modern science, of apocalyptic visions and utopian dreams. We will consider how these changing ideas about politics, religion, science and sex shaped the poems of John Donne, Aemilia Lanyer, Ben Jonson, George Herbert, Katherine Philips, John Milton, Henry Vaughan, Andrew Marvell and others. This counts toward the pre-1700 requirement for the major. Prerequisite: junior standing or ENGL 210-291 or permission of instructor.

This course will undertake a close reading and analysis of the great English epic "Paradise Lost" in the context of Milton's political and literary career: his early experiments in lyric poetry and masque; his radical support -- through prose, the writings of "[his]left hand" -- of revolution, freedom of the press and divorce; and his personal response to imprisonment and the death of his political hopes in the restoration of the English monarchy under Charles II. As we examine issues of freedom, authority and authorship in "Paradise Lost" and "Samson Agonistes", we will consider Milton's revisioning of classical epic and drama and of biblical texts. And as we explore the attempt "to justify the ways of God to men," we will pay particular attention to Milton's account of gender and his examination of the literary imagination and the creative process. We also will consider the responses of other great writers, from Milton's time to our own, to this most provocative and enduring epic. This counts towards the pre-1700 requirement for the major. Prerequisite: junior standing or ENGL 210-291 or permission of instructor.