This course presents an introduction to computer programming intended both for those who plan to take further courses in which a strong background in computation is desirable and for those who are interested in learning basic programming principles. The course will expose the student to a variety of applications where an algorithmic approach is natural and will include both numerical and non-numerical computation. The principles of program structure and style will be emphasized. SCMP 118 may be paired with SCMP 218 or either may be paired with any mathematics or statistics course to satisfy the natural science diversification requirement. No prerequisite. Offered every semester.

This course is intended as a second course in programming, as well as an introduction to the concept of computational complexity and the major abstract data structures (such as dynamic arrays, stacks, queues, link lists, graphs and trees), their implementation and application, and the role they play in the design of efficient algorithms. Students will be required to write a number of programs using a high-level language. SCMP 218 may be paired with SCMP 118 or either may be paired with any mathematics or statistics course to satisfy the natural science diversification requirement. Prerequisite: SCMP 118, MATH 138 or PHYS 270 or permission of instructor. Offered every other spring.

This course gives students experience designing, implementing, testing and debugging moderately complex systems of software components that collectively form a multilayer application. There will be an emphasis on crafting quality code, designing and implementing effective user interfaces, and building multicomponent architectures using a mix of off-the-self and custom code. Topics will include inner process and inter-system communication, multi-threading, and the synchronization of shared resources, web interfaces and working with large data sets. Students will primarily use C++, but also will learn Javascript and other languages as needed.This interdisciplinary course does not count toward the completion of any diversification requirement. Prerequisite: MATH 138, SCMP 118 or permission of instructor.

This capstone course is intended to provide an in-depth experience in computational approaches to science. Students will work on individual computational projects in various scientific disciplines. Each student will give several presentation to the class throughout the semester. Permission of the instructor and program director required.This interdisciplinary course does not count toward the completion of any diversification requirement. Prerequisite: SCMP 118 or PHYS 270, senior standing, completion of at least 0.5 units of an intermediate course and at least 0.5 units of a contributory course.

The Individual Study is to enable students to explore a pedagogically valuable topic in computing applied to the sciences that is not part of a regularly offered SCMP course. A student who wishes to propose an individual study course must first find a SCMP faculty member willing to supervise the course. The student and faculty member then craft a course syllabus that describes in detail the expected coursework and how a grade will be assigned. The amount of credit to be assigned to the IS course should be determined with respect to the amount of effort expected in a regular Kenyon class. The syllabus must be approved by the director of the SCMP program. In the case of a small group IS, a single syllabus may be submitted and all students must follow the same syllabus. Because students must enroll for individual studies by the end of the seventh class day of each semester, they should begin discussion of the proposed individual study preferably the semester before, so that there is time to devise the proposal and seek departmental approval before the registrar’s deadline. This interdisciplinary course does not count toward the completion of any diversification requirement. Permission of the instructor and program director required. No prerequisite.

Concentration

Courses that meet the requirement for this concentration:

BIOL 109YIntroduction to Experimental Biology
BIOL 110YIntroduction to Experimental Biology
BIOL 230Computational Genomics
BIOL 328Global Ecology and Biogeography
CHEM 126Introductory Chemistry Lab II
CHEM 336Quantum Chemistry
CHEM 341Instrumental Analysis
CHEM 370Advanced Lab: Computational Chemistry
CHEM 374Advanced Lab: Spectroscopy
ECON 205Introduction to Econometrics
ECON 337Portfolio Allocation and Asset Pricing
ECON 375Advanced Econometrics
ENVS 261Geographic Information Science
MATH 258Mathematical Biology
MATH 328Coding Theory and Cryptography
MATH 347Mathematical Models
PHYS 140Classical Physics
PHYS 141First Year Seminar in Physics
PHYS 146Modern Physics Lab
PHYS 240Fields and Spacetime
PHYS 241Fields and Spacetime Laboratory
PHYS 345Astrophysics and Particles
PHYS 380Introduction to Electronics
PHYS 381Projects in Electronics 1
PHYS 382Projects in Electronics 2
PHYS 385Advanced Experimental Physics 1
PHYS 386Advanced Experimental Physics 2
PHYS 387Advanced Experimental Physics 3
PHYS 493Individual Study
PSCI 280Political Analysis
PSYC 410Advanced Research Methods in Human Neuroscience
STAT 106Elements of Statistics
STAT 116Statistics in Sports
STAT 206Data Analysis
STAT 216Nonparametric Statistics
STAT 416Linear Regression Models